Mellos Records is a label founded by violinist Alda Dizdari in 2010. The label supports many of the creative projects that Alda has embarked over the years.

In October 2020 Mellos Records released a series of recordings following Alda’s journey with Elgar’s Violin Concerto in Eastern Europe. The label has released a Super Audio CD recording of the Concerto made in Moscow in 2019 with Musica Viva Orchestra and conductor Alexander Walker and for the first time since the 70s, a Vinyl version of this recording. To complete this release Mellos Records have also produced an Audiobook version of Alda’s acclaimed book “Kiss Me Again; A Memoir of Elgar in Unusual Places” Check out our online store to purchase

Mellos Records continues to look for exciting and unique projects that are personal, refreshing and reflect passionate journeys. 

Mellos Records Press

The Albanian violinist Alda Dizdari, has been featured as Gramophone’s “One to Watch” (5/11) and this disc, taken from a Wigmore Hall recital, confirms a remarkable talent. Unlike many live recordings, it’s clearly the record of a single performance; there are a few minor accidents (piano fluffs, fleetingly imperfect intonation), some audience members with annoying coughs, and I wondered whether the Bartók fugue had been part of a complete performance of the Solo Sonata. More to the point, it’s obvious that Dizdari and Blach are giving their all and not considering possible retakes. The Janácek is truly passionate, rougher than Repin and Lugansky’s recent studio recording (DG, 3/11), but this music, I think, actually benefits from moving beyond purely beautiful sounds (Janácek seems to agree, writing feroce at the start of the finale).
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The Gramophone CD Review - DUNCAN DRUCE

Alda Dizdari has made quite a musical journey of her own, from her native Albania to Romania, where she discovered the music of Enescu, to the United States and finally to London, where she gave this concert at the Wigmore Hall last year. She writes in her booklet notes that the violin in Enescu, Bartók and Janácek is a human voice, and she plays accordingly, with freedom and depth of expression, found in her constant rubato and big vibrato. Sometimes that vibrato seems a bit too big, but it certainly helps to generate passionate intensity.
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The Strad Issue: January 2011 - TIM HOMFRAY